The Best Thing about Triathlon

By Debbie
January 5, 2015 on 12:00 pm | In Community, Random Musings, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion George Cespedes. What is the best thing about triathlon? The fitness? Being able to eat whatever you want? The competition? Read on to learn what George thinks, and I think he’s onto something! Follow George on twitter – @georgecespedes.

We humans like to be part of a tribe. We have evolved to ascend to the top of the food chain, so to speak, by banding together in tribes, and through cooperation and shared experiences, built great civilizations and exist as part of many communities.

Triathlon is one such community that I love being a part of. Triathletes are awesome people. While we often find ourselves solo on long training rides or runs, or swimming endless laps in the pool with only the sound of our own labored breath in our ears, we do this to be a part of special niche in society. We share a love of testing our physical and mental boundaries, of following a training plan and the satisfaction of finishing a race.

As competitive as triathletes can be in training, racing and even life, they are also each others’ greatest cheerleaders, supporters and partners in pain.  We all know what it takes to get from the swim start to the finish chute and we love to celebrate the accomplishments of others.

Celebrating the finish - together

There is no bigger crowd gathered than around midnight of that epic race…you know the one I mean. Watching the last finishers stagger under the giant finish line clock to hear, “you are an Ironman,” somehow invigorates us all.  We race to be fit, to beat our previous finish time, to test ourselves, but we celebrate our fellow triathlete competitors’ accomplishments as happily as our own.

Crowds at midnight

Through my years as a triathlete, I have had enjoyed seeing the race kits from many different organizations and wondered what drives them to raise money for this cause or that person. I have raced for the Melanoma Research Foundation for the past two years and have just joined team Blazeman to race for ALS. I know, personally, that it gives meaning to the training time spent away from my family, the aches and pains that follow, and the tough miles out on the course. I am not just doing it for myself, for bragging rights, but to make a small difference in the world and give back to society in a meaningful and mutually beneficial way.

Another big reason I love being part of the triathlon community is because of how diverse it is. People from all walks of life, ages, and abilities make up the sport and triathlon community. I love meeting triathletes at different events across the country. Being a member of the TriSports Champions team has given me the opportunity to meet so many of these unique and wonderful people. We are all out there racing for our own reasons, but we share a lot of the same experiences and goals.  I follow my teammates and friends to see how they are doing and I know they are doing the same for me. We want everyone to have a good race, to have a PR, to finish, because beyond our competitive fire is a shared passion for the sport and we know what it takes to finish, even if you are the last finisher.

Diversity is the name of the game

Being part of the triathlon community has enriched my life in so many ways.  It’s about so much more than being really fit, new PRs, finisher’s medals and swag bags, though. The best thing about triathlon is the triathletes!

Three Disciplines – HOPE, PURPOSE, VISION

By Debbie
December 29, 2014 on 12:00 pm | In Community, Random Musings | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion Kent Rodahaver. Need some inspiration in your next race? Look no further than the person right next to you!

I was looking at some images in my computer’s photo folder recently and came across this one of the race start at Lake Placid a couple of years ago. Most of these races begin with a mass swim start – often referred to as “combat swimming,” “the human blender,” and “open water mixed martial arts” by participants. It is truly one of the most fascinating spectacles in all of sport, and looking at this made me reflect on the how the triathlon experience parallels some of the challenges of being a business leader in today’s demanding and challenging social environment.

Swim or Blender?

In theory, triathlon is really an individual sport – you are competing against yourself, – your previous performance and time, aiming at each race to record a new PR. Pushing yourself, persevering and gritting it out to cross the finish line is part of the triathlon culture. And it begins with the chaotic swim while you are simultaneously battling for space in the water with 2000+ other athletes and occasionally seeking support and encouragement from them to start your journey. Believe me…after about 11 or 12 hours and it starts to get dark, you are searching for any type of encouragement – feeding off of the enthusiasm of the crowd, the encouragement of fellow athletes who are feeling the same excitement (and pain), recognizing a similar goal, and striving for the same finish line. That energy is great to share and it is even better to receive. That energy is amazing!

While racing a triathlon is mainly a solo endeavor, wise and experienced endurance athletes understand that they gain strength, energy, and inspiration from their fellow racers, particularly in a long distance race like iron distance events where an athlete can be on the race course for up to 17 hours. In any endurance race it is natural to have a singular focus on you – on your performance, on how you are doing at critical points in the race, on what’s up ahead and how you will adjust your race plan for changing weather, equipment problems or physical issues.

While not a "team" event, encouragement among competitors is prevalent

Likewise, as a business owner and community leader in these challenging times I have occasional concerns about my own personal effectiveness; about how I can help achieve more with less; and how I will inspire other business leaders and community members who are also trying to anticipate issues and obstacles that may affect their business decisions, mission, and community out-reach. With so many demands on our time and resources it often seems like a daunting task to step back and seek insight, support, and counsel from our peers and others around us.

My hope for all business organizations, individuals, and fellow athletes is for us to stand out in the community as giving, caring, hospitable, and welcoming. Role-model the type of behavior you would like others to exhibit, get involved in your community, and share often. I want people impacted by us to talk about endurance athlete leaders with excitement and enthusiasm. Triathletes are an exciting, electric, goal-driven bunch. Wouldn’t you like to see more community leaders with similar qualities?

Finishing strong

You may not share my intense passion for having thousands of people thrashing about in the water around you, or biking and running until you are about to collapse, but a few wise, well-chosen fellow travelers on your journey could make the difference between slowly inching forward each day toward your goals and quickly and efficiently crossing the finish line with a smile!

How to Deal with Long-Lasting Injuries

By Debbie
December 22, 2014 on 12:18 pm | In Community, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Team Athlete Laura Balis. She has, unfortunately, gotten very familiar with injury, so pay attention, what she has to say just may help you! Follow Laura on Twitter – @LauraBalis.

This isn’t the most upbeat topic to write or read about… but it’s something I’ve dealt with for the past year, and I’m sure there are others out there going through similar struggles. It seems like triathletes don’t like to talk about or admit that we’re injured. Maybe we don’t want our competitors to know that we’re injured and feel like they have an edge on us. But there are also times when we’re not at our best and race anyway, and we feel like telling everyone, “Hey, you only beat me today because I’m injured!” But of course we don’t do that.

Staying motivated when you’re dealing with a long-lasting injury can be tough. I’m hoping that by sharing some of my experiences and tips, I may be able to help someone else who’s dealing with a pain-in-the-butt injury.

To make a long, long story short, I’ve dealt with calf pain and plantar fasciitis for about three years, and haven’t been able to run at all for the past year and a half. So, after this long ordeal that I’m going through, here’s my advice for physically and mentally dealing with injuries:

  • Get second opinions – and third, fourth, and fifth… Be stubborn! I really believed that there was someone out there who could figure out and treat my injuries, so I kept going until I found someone who could. There are lots of good doctors and PTs out there, but they don’t all have experience with the same injuries.
  • Figure out who your support network is. I talked to my husband about my injuries, a lot – probably more than he wanted to hear! I also had a couple girlfriends and my sister who I could call for a sympathetic ear or some advice.
  • Do what you can and what’s fun. Luckily, most of the time that I’ve been dealing with the calf and foot issues, I’ve still been able to swim and ride. But I didn’t really feel motivated to go out and ride for hours and hours by myself when I wasn’t training for anything, and didn’t know if I had any races in my future. So I did whatever I felt like, mostly lots of shorter, fun rides with my husband on the river trail. As for swimming, I was able to join in with a friend’s swim workouts – and only do the parts that sounded fun!
  • Find some new hobbies or something else to do with your time. When you can’t train much, all of a sudden you have more free time! The doctor and physical therapy appointments and rehab exercises can take some time. But if you still have more time, maybe pick up an extra hobby or volunteer to keep yourself busy and keep your mind off of not training. I started doing some freelance work on top of my normal job since I had more time for it.
  • Stay motivated (as much as you can!). One thing that helped me as I started feeling like I’d make it through the injuries and be able to race again was putting together a tentative race schedule for the season. It was fun to look up different races and start to get excited about them, and was enough motivation to get me out the door for some longer rides.

GO for FUN rides...there's more out there than just training rides!

Things I Found Out Being a First Time Mom

By Debbie
December 16, 2014 on 4:28 pm | In Community, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Team Athlete Hayley Benson. Think you have to give up your triathlon lifestyle because you are starting a family? Think again! Follow Hayley’s blog.

Pregnancy:

No matter what kind of shape you are in, or what kind of athlete you are, or how strong willed you, are your body and pregnancy will have its own ideas.  I was quite convinced that I would run throughout my pregnancy. We lived so close to the hospital that I was even convinced that I would jog the 1.5 miles to the delivery room when labor arrived.  How naïve was I!  I am one of those annoying people who actually likes running and could run a sub-6 minute mile even after months of not running, so I thought for sure I would be running through my pregnancy.  This just wasn’t the case. I managed a little bit in the early stages, but due to the Arizona heat, the bowling ball in my stomach and the nausea, I just couldn’t do it at all after 28 weeks.

Doing flip turns in the pool during pregnancy will not harm your baby.

No amount of activity, swimming, hiking, running, whatever you are able to do during pregnancy, will induce labor. When it’s time, it’s time, there’s no changing it. I was taking long hikes, swimming 1000s of yards and my baby was still late.

Pregnant and active!

After delivery:

I’m sorry to say, but you will pee yourself while running the first few times after delivery. Things are a little stretched out and traumatized down there, but this is a TRANSIENT thing and it does go away.

You will get your fitness back far quicker than you ever expected. You will not believe this, but I’m writing it anyway because it is true.  I understand why you don’t believe it, you are bloated, beyond tired, still on the heavy side even after dumping out the actual baby, but you do get your fitness back fast. The body is remarkable at recovery.

Getting out with baby...the new training methods!

The first few months of babyhood:

Every new Mom athlete needs to have an espresso machine and a treadmill.  You will be sleeping A LOT less and you will need caffeine.  You will need to take advantage of when baby sleeps to get some training done, so buy a decent treadmill…you are going to use it a lot. You don’t have to get a new one, there are some great deals on Craigslist.

Get back on the bandwagon with racing, that first race is always going to be nerve-wracking, but when it comes down to it, it’s an accomplishment in itself just to be on the starting line when you are trying to care for a young baby.  I can attest that even if you can’t breast feed your baby right before the start of a 10km race, your baby will not starve during the time it takes you to complete the race, no matter how slow you are.  I remember being quite convinced that my baby would starve while I did my first 10km post delivery. Hey, I was sleep deprived and rational thought was non-existent.  Triathlons generally take longer than running races, so I would advise either breast feeding or pumping before the race, especially if your Tri top is very tight fitting because you will not be able to get it on without pumping first!

Still getting medals post-pregnancy!

You will have to train tired…if you waited to train until you weren’t tired you would never get any training done.  You can tolerate more sleep deprivation than you think you can, and don’t listen to the “babies sleep through the night at x weeks/months old, at x weight, at x developmental stage,” your baby will sleep through the night whenever he or she feels like it. In my case I had to wait 9 months!

The times when you could ride your bike from sunrise to sunset, when you could just take off on an adventure trail run and come back when you feel like it are gone, you have to think about who is going to watch the baby.  If you are lucky enough to get out for an epic training session, it can’t be too epic as you have to be able to function when you get home. There are no days off from motherhood (yes, you will have a bit of nostalgia for those old times…it’s OK to feel like that).

Hire a coach if at all possible. If you are like most mere mortals, you are also working a steady job, as well as being an athlete and a parent, and you don’t have the time to put in crazy amounts of hours training. A coach will help streamline what you do.  I am actually faster post-baby and with less hours training all thanks to a good coach.

Being an athlete and a Mom isn’t easy, but then again, if it were easy it wouldn’t be worth doing. My daughter, Sierra, is worth the challenges I have had to overcome with my athletics and she enriches my life.  I’m looking forward to teaching her to swim, bike and run, just like mom!

Fast mama

Triathlon Recovery 101

By Debbie
November 25, 2014 on 1:23 pm | In Nutrition Tips, Product Information, Random Musings, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Team Athlete Ali Rutledge. During this week of giving thanks, you should also thank your body by giving it the tools to recover better! Follow Ali on Twitter – alaida.

When it comes to triathlon success, recovery is a key component. Here are a few things to help you recover to your best.

  1. Compression - Use after a hard workout to speed up the recovery process. This will promote blood flow and remove toxins from your aching muscles. You can use a variety of socks, calf sleeves (active recovery only – do NOT use if you are just lounging around), tights or recovery pump boots, just to name a few.

    Zensah Argyle Compression Socks

  2. Ice - Used since the beginning of triathlon time, cold water is cheap and reduces soreness. A bath tub, lake or any body of water 55 degrees for 15 minutes will do. Your best result will be after your hard workout. If you have problems tolerating the cold, sipping warm fluids can help.

    Ice can really suck in the short run, but the benefits are awesome!

  3. Massage - You can use your own licensed massage therapist or your own tools for self massage. Today there are many massage tools on the market. Just a few to name are a foam roller, the Stick, or Trigger Point Therapy products. Massage promotes healing by removing old blood with toxins and getting fresh blood flow to the injured areas to promote recovery.

    Work the junk out of those muscles!

  4. Active Recovery - This will promote blood flow and homeostasis if done correctly. An easy spin, low-intensity run or an easy swim can promote recovery to injured tissues. You must leave your ego at home for this one!
  5. Rest - Recovery days, good sleep and a mental boost are imperative for improving athletic performance. We all need physical and mental relief from the stress of training. Doing something different or just a sleep-in day is a good example. You will feel fresh and ready to go the next day.
  6. Nutrition – Within 30 minutes after a hard training session, recovery nutrition is important to repair muscles and rebuild glycogen stores. There are many bars, shakes or just real food from which to chose. Blender bottles work great to mix any drinks. Eat like a champion!!

    Be smart with your nutrition

A training plan is not complete without a good recovery plan.  Being smart about your recovery will be the key to making a happy and healthy triathlete.  Cheers to swim, bike, run and recovery!

Addicted? No…OK, Well, Maybe…Yes, Yes, I Am

By Debbie
November 18, 2014 on 3:04 pm | In Community, Random Musings | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion Tom Golden and Team athlete Leo Carrillo. They are partners in triathlon and, apparently, enable each other. Hey guys, we can probably find you some help! (Editor’s note – In no way is this blog post meant to bring lightness to the serious problems of addiction…it is meant only to make fun of ourselves).

[Scene]  I’m on a Hawaiian Airlines flight to Kona for a vacation with my family. I’m feeling super pumped to be going to the home of triathlon’s biggest event. In the plane, I am waiting in that peculiar line for the bathroom and some guy says to me, “You do triathlons?” I’m thinking, “Why would he ask that? Is it my shaved legs, my year round tan, my Zoot shoes or possibly my fit triathlete looking physique?” “I do,” I replied, beaming with pride, “how did you know?” “Your Oceanside 70.3 shirt,” he says. “Ohhhh, right my shirt,” I reply. “You do triathlons?” I ask. “I did, most addicting sport ever,” he says. How great is this, a fellow triathlete to chat with on my way to Kona, this is great! He then goes on to say, “My wife divorced me and my kids hate me because of triathlon and it nearly ruined my life. It’s a selfish sport,” he says. I was speechless. You would have thought I was talking to a recovering addict. The nerve of this guy! Well, for the next few hours, I started to think about what he said. Addicting, could one be addicted to triathlon? Maybe? So I started thinking what the similarities between a Triathlete guy and an Addict guy might be, just to check his theory. My training partner, Leo, and I came up with the following:

  1. Addict guy usually has a partner that he uses with; Triathlete guy has a training partner.
  2. The lean physique of Addict guy and race ready Triathlete guy could be confused for one another.
  3. Addict guy gets cranky and agitated when he can’t get his fix, whatever that may be; Triathlete guy also gets cranky and agitated when he can’t train.
  4. Addict guy has a dealer or supplier; Triathlon guy has TriSports, run by the one they call Seton.
  5. Willingness to spend top dollar on the best stuff, interchangeable.
  6. “I can do more, I can handle it.”  Interchangeable.
  7. Despite the amount of pain and suffering, you continue to do it anyway, interchangeable again.
  8. Addict guy craving a six and a half hour high sounds like awesome, normal fun (for him). Triathlon guy craving a six and half hour workout also sounds like awesome, normal fun.
  9. Addict guy pushing the limits, teetering on the edge; much like Triathlon guy pushing the limits on a long training session, risking injury. Both would say totally worth the gains.
  10. Addict guy swearing he’ll give up his addiction after being caught/busted/found out, even as he’s planning how to do it again.  Triathlete guy 20 miles into the run during an iron distance race swears never again and tells himself this was a stupid idea, yet he finds himself standing in a long line with stiff, sore legs the next day, credit card tightly in hand, ready to sign up again.

Well, there you have it. I may have been stretching on a few of those, but let’s face it…this is an addicting sport. I admit it has a grip on me and my fellow triathletes. Just call me Triathlon addict guy, I’m OK with that, I guess. Maybe the airplane guy had a point, but for me, it’s a good addiction. Triathlon has taken me to some really cool places to race. It’s transformed my health and physical condition. I’ve learned to push myself and juggle a loaded work/family/training schedule. Most importantly, I’ve met some really unique and great people over the years. After being a triathlete, anything in life will be a piece of cake. Yup, I’m OK with the thought of being a Triathlon addict! OK, gotta go…need to get to TriSports now!

Tom & Leo share the podium

Free Speed

By Zachary
November 11, 2014 on 2:51 pm | In Uncategorized | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Team TriSports member Thomas Gerlach. He is in his third full year as a professional triathlete and recently took 2nd at Ironman Louisville, along with numerous podiums in 2013 including 2nd at Ironman Louisville and 7th at both Ironman Los Cabos and Coeur d’Alene. He has the 3rd fastest Ironman bike split by an American at 4:15:57. He writes a weekly training update every week at www.thomasgerlach.com where he publishes his weekly training numbers. Follow him at facebook.com/thomasgerlach and twitter.com/thomasgerlach

Race Wheels? How About Cleaning and Optimizing Your Drivetrain?

Why is it that people train on training wheels and with a road helmet, but then swap them out on race day for race wheels and an aero helmet?  I would argue that most people do it because they want to go faster on race day by improving aerodynamics. So why do people race on a drivetrain that is dirty and non-optimized? The reason I believe this to be the case is because people don’t understand how much time they are giving up in a dirty drivetrain, and particularly one that is not engineered for speed. If you are a serious racer looking to go as fast possible, then you need to look at places your competition isn’t. Looking around at the rest of the Pro bikes in transition I can tell you one place my competition is losing “Free Speed” is in their drivetrains.

Keep you drivetrain clean for free speed

Keep you drivetrain clean for free speed

According to Friction Facts – a totally independent testing company – those racing a dirty drivetrain could be losing as much as 7 watts in a dirty chain. A chain that was clean but had the lubed stripped off was as much as 20 watts. In both cases the load on the chain tested was 250 watts – a very realistic output of a rider unlike the unrealistic number of 30mph used in wind tunnel tests. But the savings don’t stop there. Just like race wheels are tuned to be as aerodynamic as possible over training wheels, there are drivetrains that have been engineered to reduce the energy that is normally lost in mechanical inefficiencies. One company that is engineering drivetrains to be as efficient as possible is a company called Atomic.

Aftermarket chainring coatings

Atomic specializes in making drivetrains as fast as possible but they don’t actually manufacturer drivetrain parts. Instead Atomic has a special coating that is impregnated on to your current chainrings, cassettes and metal derailleur pulleys. This coating reduces the friction between their specially lubed chain and those parts and results in an energy savings. In this case the savings is through improved mechanical efficiency and not aerodynamics. The benefits, however, are still the same…you either go the same speed on less watts, or you go faster on the same watts. Using Atomic coated chainrings, cassette, and chain, the rider can save an additional 43 seconds over an Olympic distance triathlon, 1 minute and 37 seconds over a half-Ironman, and 3 minutes and 14 seconds over a full Ironman.

Next time you set out to race, make sure you have a clean drive train. You can clean a drive train in 10 seconds by using some White Lightning Clean Streak Degreaser and then properly lube the chain afterwards. If you want to go as fast as possible, though, you can send your current parts in for coating to Atomic or you can always purchase a new set of chainrings and a cassette from TriSports.com and send them in for coating, as well. Either way, when you combine it with race wheels and an aero helmet, you will know you will be going as fast as possible.

Becoming Friends with the Bike

By Debbie
November 4, 2014 on 11:42 am | In Life at TriSports.com, Product Information, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Team TriSports member Pam Winders. She’s living proof that you simply can’t fake the bike. Follow Pam on Twitter – pamye6.

It’s interesting how things always come full circle. This past summer I have had friends come up to me after races, devastated with their bike performance. They proceed to pick my brain as to why I believe their bike didn’t go as planned and what training they could have done prior to the race in order to succeed and see where they went wrong. It amazed me how many of those people had only gone on a ride or two prior to the race. So with that, I basically told them what they didn’t want to hear, which was the obvious; if you want to do well and meet your goals, then you have to do the work and actually train for your desired results.

When I first started triathlon four years ago I was always amazed with the bike portion of the race…there are some really fast riders out there! I wanted to be the fastest, so my first goal in triathlon was to “master,” or at least get better on, the bike. I quickly learned two things; 1) Bikes are REALLY expensive and 2) There are no shortcuts to success – aka: you have to do the work in order to see the results you’re seeking.

With my overachieving goal of always being on the podium, I went out and bought Betty, an awesome women’s specific Felt DA, and a bike trainer. When I started triathlon I was living in Alaska, so getting out on the road and accumulating what I call “real life” miles was nonexistent; therefore the trainer was a necessity. In addition, I purchased my first pair of heavy duty diaper biking shorts. I wasn’t winning any fashion awards in them, and I definitely wasn’t picking up any hot guys, but I knew that in order for me to put the time in the saddle, comfort was vital.

Hardcore cycling in Alaska

From that point on I spent many days, especially Sundays, in my living room watching NFL while riding Betty instead of snuggled up on the couch. As I began to educate myself more on biking, I learned to incorporate more specific workouts for racing and that’s when the real fun began. I would include hill repeats, speed and distance intervals and soon enough I was seeing dramatic changes in my riding; I could ride longer and was stronger and faster!!

My real love for biking didn’t come until after that initially painful boring living room period from which I went out and did my first “real life” ride of the season racing St. George 70.3. Not the smartest move on my part after training in dark, cold Alaska on a trainer and a treadmill all winter, but all the hard work and time I put in by becoming friends with my bike made it so worth it and I was actually able to enjoy the ride instead of suffer through it.

After St. George I’ve continued to embrace my bike; I’ve put on a power meter, which I’d highly recommend to anyone wanting to race competitively or who has a thing for numbers. By incorporating power into my riding, it has taken my training to a whole different excruciating level of pain and sweat, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

A strong bike = good chances for a podium position!

In the end, the only way to get better and have fun while riding is to put in the time and become friends with your bike!!

After the Finish Line

By Debbie
October 28, 2014 on 9:30 am | In Athlete Profile, Community, Random Musings, Sponsorship | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion Martin Soole. We all know what we do leading up to a race…train, train, train! But what about after? Check out Martin’s blog or follow him on Twitter – martin.soole.

There are many points in life when one must reevaluate and refocus.  I’ve recently found myself at one of those points. I spent all of last year training and racing toward an Ironman finish. It was a rather simple, lovely existence.  I woke up every morning and knew I had to train.  I put in hours and hours of work.  I bought the best gear available from TriSports.com, I learned from the best; I was the best physical version of myself capable of the world’s most challenging one day endurance race.

Before Ironman Lake Tahoe 2013

If you followed my blogs last year, you know that my Ironman debut in Lake Tahoe in 2013 did not go as planned. Read that article here.

The hundreds of training hours couldn’t prepare me for a bike mechanical failure that ended my day prematurely.  I mourned that defeat for a long time. I had so many questions.  I drove myself crazy trying to make sense of it all and come to terms with an event that was ultimately out of my hands. I had done everything in my power to be prepared for that race.  I even trained with my coach on the course the previous month. But the Universe had other plans.  It turns out that I gained more from that defeat than I would have if I had finished.

When I was training on a daily basis I didn’t make room in my life for anything else.  I felt like a monk at times.  I stopped socializing with friends, I only ate a strict diet, I let my business dealings lag, and fell out of touch with the artistic reasons for my move to LA in the first place.  Many athletes can find balance during their Ironman journey.  I was obsessed and I could not.

I moved to LA to work in film and TV. Here I am (far right) on the Showtime show “Shameless”.

It turns out that I needed a big let down to allow me the breathing room to refocus my energy and begin anew. If I had finished the race, I would have probably gone right into the next and the next and the next and been swept up in the sport and only the sport. There is certainly nothing wrong with this, but I would not have been able to walk down that path in a healthy way. I could have further alienated my friends and family and lost sight of my career goals. I can’t stress enough how obsessed and out of balance I was. But there were lessons to be learned here if I was willing to take note.

All that time spent training and racing was not lost. Ultimately, I learned what I was capable of, I found my limits, and learned how to push past them. This could not have been learned in any other way. Triathlon has many transferable life skills. Self reliance, resilience in the face of challenges, and mental toughness are just a few that come to mind. These skills have come into play in my professional life, as I am now producing a feature film called “#Speedball.”  It’s an action sports drama, think; “Fast and the Furious” meets the sport of paintball. If you think triathlon is hard, try producing a multi-million dollar movie franchise.

Despite the Heartbreak at Ironman Lake Tahoe, I knew I needed some redemption and wanted to release the pain of that event from my life.  I fulfilled that at Ironman California 70.3.  It wasn’t the full Ironman finish I had striven for, but this victory was in some ways better. I looked back at the previous year and decided to do things differently as I prepared this time. While training, I started dating a wonderful girl, I kept my relationships strong, and moved forward with all areas of my life. I was able to balance my entertainment career, my personal life, and my training.  I had learned the lesson I was meant to and found closure with the event in Lake Tahoe.

A victory kiss from my girlfriend

I still swim, bike, and run. I moved to the beach with that wonderful girl I started dating and I’ve picked up surfing. My life is more full and vibrant than it has ever been.  From my greatest disappointment came the opportunity to live the balanced life I was meant to live.

Surfing Soole

So, in the midst of heartbreak and setbacks, take a moment to stop and reevaluate. One area of your life may be out of balance.  That situation is there for a very specific purpose.  Once you’re able to release the hurt, look for the gift in the ashes. There is a lesson to be learned. Don’t mourn the failure; it might be just what you needed. Most of all, don’t forget to keep moving forward.

The Off-Season

By Debbie
October 21, 2014 on 1:51 pm | In Life at TriSports.com, Product Information, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Team TriSports athlete Liz Miller. The off-season is coming, so what are you going to do about it? Check out Liz’s blog or follow her on Twitter – FeWmnLiz (can you tell she’s a geologist?).

Some people dread the off-season, and other people love it. I usually feel a little bit of both excitement and anxiety when it’s time to transition to the off-season. Excitement because the off-season typically means sleeping in, weekends away without my swim, bike, and run gear, and maybe more than just an occasional glass of wine. Dread because the off-season also means shorter days, potential lack of motivation, and the occasional unwanted weight gain (especially around the holidays!).

In preparation for my off-season, I started looking around for some fun activities that didn’t necessarily involve swimming, biking, or running, or least not all 3 activities in the same race! Here are a few ideas for those of you who are getting ready to start your off-season, or maybe just looking for a few ideas to refresh your off-season routine.

Find a new type of race

I recently participated in my very first ultra-marathon. I have always been intrigued by ultra-marathons, but I typically need to save my quads and knees for quality long runs during Ironman training. This means that running 50K on trails is out of the question! But once your triathlon season is done, an ultra-marathon is a great way to put your fitness into something new and different.

I had a blast in my first ultra-marathon, not to mention the fact that since I wasn’t running with the goal of winning, I had more than enough time to stop and take pictures! Who can complain about running 50K when you have beautiful scenery like this?

The view during the Mt. Taylor 50K on 9/27/2014 (mttaylor50k.com)

Also, if you live somewhere with snow, look for some winter racing options. Snowshoe and cross country ski races are a great way to have some fun and challenge yourself without the pressure or stress that can sometimes be involved with a triathlon.

The ski to snowshoe transition during the Mt. Taylor Quad a few years ago (mttaylorquad.org)

Lastly, the winter can be a great time to try a swim meet or two! I participated in my first swim meet two years ago, and while I got DQ’ed from one event and certainly didn’t win any of the other events that I entered, I had a good time and enjoyed the challenge. Check out the U.S. Masters website for a list of local Masters groups that might be sponsoring an upcoming meet.

Try something new (or go back to something old!)

A few years ago, I took an “Introduction to Kettlebells” class that was required before participating in the local YMCA’s kettlebell course. I was hooked! It was a great mix of strength training and cardio work, and the 6 AM class was a great way to kick off the workday. The off-season is the perfect time to work on strength training (which is often overlooked during triathlon training), and kettlebells is a great way to do that.

Other strength training classes include TRX, Cross Fit, and other local YMCA or gym classes. I have found that TRX is another butt-kicker of a workout, relying mostly on body weight rather than weights, but don’t let that fool you into thinking that it’s easy!

Yoga and Pilates are additional options for new and different workouts that offer a nice variety to your typical swim, bike, and run schedule. Power and Bikram yoga can both be very challenging if you feel that you need a harder workout, and Pilates can really help with core strength, which can translate into better cycling form and faster running.

Most importantly, enjoy yourself!

The off-season shouldn’t be about constantly watching your food intake, weeks of difficult workouts, and a lack of social life. The off-season should be about kicking back, enjoying a treat now and then, and maybe sitting on the couch to watch a little more football than what is reasonable. Even more importantly, the off-season is about giving your mind and body a break from the rigors of triathlon training, to have some fun and not be too worried about missing a workout here and there.

Kicking back during a week-long canoe trip on Lake Mead during my winter off-season, 2012

The off-season also gives all of us triathletes time to step back, reflect on our performances over the season, and set new goals for the next year. And it’s important to remember that while we might lose a bit of fitness during the off-season, we’ll quickly gain it back at the start of the season, along with a renewed excitement for the sport and exciting goals to keep us motivated for the season.

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