Triathlon Travel Tips

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August 18, 2015 on 4:41 pm | In Community, From the shop, Life at TriSports.com, Product Information, Races, Random Musings, Sponsorship | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Team pro athlete Scott Bradley. Some of you are fortunate and have a ton of races close to home from which to choose your season schedule. But for the rest of us (um, open water in Tucson…no), we need to travel to get in a good season of racing. Here’s some great travel advice from someone who has done it a lot. You’ll want to take notes for your next race! Check out Scott’s blog and follow him on Twitter – @scottbradley11.

Travel seems to go hand in hand with racing triathlon. Unless you live in an area where there are lots of races and you are happy doing them year after year, at some point you’re going to have to pack up and hit the road to get to a race. If you’re like me, that’s part of the fun of it. Triathlon has taken me to places I never would have dreamed of otherwise going and I’ve loved each place I’ve had the opportunity to visit. Each city or town is unique and interesting in its own way and the courses offer different challenges.

As much fun as it is to see new places and race new courses, it doesn’t come without its share of difficulties. I’ve tried to compile a list of some of the things I’ve learned from travel experiences to help make yours go a little more smoothly.

  1. Carry on. If you are flying, anything that you absolutely need to have with you for your race should go in your carry on bag. Let’s face it, suitcases get lost and things can get damaged when you check your luggage. I can comfortably fit all the race gear I need in a transition bag that I keep close to me the entire trip.
  2. Pack light. That being said, you don’t want to lug a 40 pound bag through the airport. The minimalist approach will be best. Spend some time deciding what gear you will actually need and what you’d end up not using. Leave that stuff at home.
  3. Research ahead of time. Find out where you can eat healthily and affordably. When you arrive at your destination and are starving because all you had on the flight was the world’s smallest bag of pretzels, you will not want to spend time searching for restaurants. And you don’t want to settle for fast food that will give you gut rot in the days before your race. Having a plan will make your life easier.
  4. Hydrate. Bring your own empty water bottle that you can fill up once you pass through security. Maybe bring some Nuun tabs to make sure your electrolytes are replenished, as well.

    Hydration & snacks...don't be without!

  5. Pack snacks. I like to have some healthy snacks on hand so when I get hungry I don’t have to run into the first gas station I see. Fruit, nuts, healthy granola bars or some Honey Stinger waffles are easy to carry and make a great quick snack.
  6. Nail down your bike transport method. There are many different ways to get your bike to a race when flying, each with its own pros and cons. I have used companies like TriBike Transport. It’s great to not have to lug your bike through the airport and convenient if you live near a partner shop, but you might end up being without your bike for a couple of weeks before and after your race. If you only have one bike, that’s not good. I’ve sent my bike via FedEx to my hotel. Again, nice not to lug the bike, but you are without it a few days again. This year, because of the amount of traveling I will be doing, I’ve decided to get a good travel case to fly with and bring my bike myself. Be prepared, though, to rent a much larger vehicle than you would need if not traveling with your bike. Find what works for you and what will make you most comfortable.

    How do you take your bike?

  7. Rest up. Travel can be exhausting. It disrupts your routines and normal sleep patterns. Hotel beds are not always the most comfortable, either. Add in pre-race nerves and you might not be getting the best sleep before your event. I’m blessed with the ability to sleep anywhere, so if I feel tired I let myself sleep. Naps during the day, on the flight, or in the car (unless you’re driving) all add up and can help make you feel rested, which is one of the biggest contributing factors to having a good race.
  8. Keep your routines. As much as you can, try to keep things as consistent as possible. The time you go to bed and wake up. Your food habits. Go for an easy swim or jog if possible. All of these things will help make you feel more like you are at home and will bring you some comfort and peace of mind.

Triathlon can be a great way to travel and see the world. It isn’t always easy, but you can certainly make it less stressful with proper planning and preparation. A certain amount of flexibility and adaptability is required, and you can’t let things out of your control throw you into a spiral. Hopefully these tips can make your race travel a bit easier and more enjoyable. Safe travels!

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