The Age Grouper’s Holy Grail

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March 3, 2015 on 10:49 am | In Community, Nutrition Tips, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Brooks Vandivort, former TriSports Champion and current TriSports fan. They say “you are what you eat,” but are you really giving your diet the attention it deserves? Read on to learn the importance of eating right while training.  Check out Brooks’ blog and follow him on Twitter – @TriBrooks.

So you bought a bike, running shoes, a Speedo and more GU, Clif bars, and Honey Stinger gel than you can handle. You probably have downloaded several training programs or might even have a coach. You have read the books, blogs, and magazine articles and slowly your body has responded to become a fit age group triathlete. You probably have a full-time job, family, other hobbies and a busy schedule, but the triathlete in you wants to be even better this season. So what can you do to see a noticeable increase in fitness and performance without killing yourself in training or distancing yourself from your family?

Brooks being a fit age group triathlete

Whatever you call your daily eating habits: fuel, diet, food, sustenance, it is probably the single biggest variable you can change in order to perform at the next level. Let’s face the facts. We wouldn’t run a race with one shoe or ride our bike with the front brakes engaged, so why do we continue to hold ourselves back by eating a poor diet? I’ll be the first to admit that diet is my biggest problem in preparing for my season. To borrow a few boxing terms, my “walk around” weight is 177 lbs. My “fighting” weight or racing weight is optimal at 165 lbs. I’m 6’2” and race in the male 40-45 age group. To the average person I look fit and to many I look a bit too much on the skinny side, but as a triathlete I know that I can be doing a much better job at what goes into my body.

Remember when you first started out in the world of triathlon and training was literally a workout? You had to push yourself to roll out of bed or mentally psych yourself out in order to finish that 5 hour bike ride, but now after a few years, training is a way of life. The same thing can happen with your diet. Make what you eat a way of life. If you are not already doing it, incorporate more fruits and vegetables along with lots of water into your daily routine. I know this is the same advice that you have probably heard a million times, but it really does make a difference. Most, if not all, age group triathletes are never going to run five minute miles or average 28 mph on the bike, but with proper daily nutrition we can begin to shave off those precious seconds that can move us to consistent podium finishers. A couple easy tips to follow that will help you on your way to feeling and racing with more energy and strength:

1. Have a food log. MyFitnessPal is an easy and free website and app that allows you to track what you are eating and drinking. Seeing the amount of calories you are taking in really sheds light on either your good or bad habits. It also tracks your workouts and weight.

2. More frequent small meals versus less frequent large meals. Given the amount of time spent training, frequent small meals really just make more sense, as well as being a better way to fuel your body. Most of us have some combination of two disciplines that we train for everyday and need to be able to fuel the body in order to maximize our training time. Small meals allow for a nice boost of energy without causing that sluggish feeling.

More small versus less big meals

3. The last tip is probably the most important, but also the hardest to accomplish. Make your diet just as important as your training program. Seriously, most us obsess about what workout(s) we have planned for the day, but most of the time think of eating as the thing we do so we don’t die! This season plan your meals just as carefully as you plan your training and I guarantee you will see results. Good luck and keep your wheels on the road!

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