An Interview with a Future Triathlete

By
February 24, 2015 on 2:32 pm | In Athlete Profile, Community, Races, Random Musings, Sponsorship | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Meredith Yox, TriSports Champion and super-mom. Youth races are popping up all over, but what do you tell your young’un when they ask you about it? Here’s your chance to let them hear about it from the perspective of another kid.  Check out Meredith’s blog and follow her on Twitter – @cabullydogs.

Sydney Yox is a nine year old fourth grader who, after three years of competitive running and swimming, decided to try her first triathlon last August. The following is an interview conducted with her after completing her first triathlon.

Sydney Yox pre-race

Why did you decide to try triathlon?

When I saw my Mom do all the triathlons and she told me how it was and how she did, it sounded fun. Then my Mom asked me if I wanted to try a triathlon since I had gotten comfortable on a two wheel bike, and I did.

How were you feeling before your first one?

I was feeling really nervous. I was trying to focus on one thing at a time and how it would all work out. How I would run and what it would be like to do it all.

Did you have any plan before the race?

My Mom told me to focus on one thing at a time. The swimming first, then focus on the biking when I was on the bike, and then focus on the run during the run. So that’s what I did.

How did you feel when you finished the swim?

I didn’t have a cramp, and I didn’t feel tired. So I said to myself, “Okay.  Focus on the bike now!”

How was transition?

It was really hard because I was all wet, and it was hard to dry off and get my helmet on over my pony tail. It also was really hard when I came back because someone had put their bike in my spot.

How did you feel on the bike?

I didn’t feel too bad.  I didn’t feel tired.  But I was scared because there were bumps in the road, and I was scared I would fall. But I was able to do it.

Once you made it to the run what was going through your head?

My body was saying, “You’re almost done.  You’re almost there!  You haven’t stopped yet, and you haven’t slowed down.  You’re almost at the finish, and you can do it!”

Sydney killing it on the run (and sporting a 2XU Girl's Active TriSuit)

How did it feel to cross the finish line?

I felt really good because I had just completed my first triathlon! I was really tired, and my throat was sore from breathing too hard. I felt proud of myself when they gave me my medal.

What’s your favorite part about multi-sport events?

I really like the biking because it’s easier than the swimming and running.

Now that you have completed one triathlon and one duathlon what’s next?

The SuperKid triathlon in Santa Cruz, CA.

If you met another kid who was thinking about doing a triathlon what would tell them?

Don’t be nervous, you’re going to be great! It’s actually really fun!

Sydney post-race with her Mom and 6 year old sister Kylie, who competed in the 6 & under division

Editor’s note: Is your child interested in trying a tri? TriSports has a whole lot of kid-specific gear. Check it out here!

Eye Care Needs for Triathletes

By
February 17, 2015 on 2:27 pm | In Community, From the shop, Life at TriSports.com, Product Information, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Team TriSports athlete Steve Rosinski. We frequently think about protecting things like our head, but how often do you think about protecting your eyes? They’re kind of important. Learn some tips from Steve, who isn’t only a pro triathlete, but an Optometrist, as well! And you thought your schedule was busy! Check out Steve’s blog or follow him on Twitter – @steverosinski.

As a Doctor of Optometry I think about the eyes a lot! And being a Professional Triathlete I think about Triathlons probably even more!  With both of them being such an integral part of my life I want to share my thoughts on the importance of eyewear – whether sun or prescription, goggles and even contact lenses.

Let’s first take a look at sunglasses.  Sunglasses are in every triathlete’s bag of essentials when it comes to training and race day.  They not only make you look extra cool with the latest colors, shapes and designs, but they also protect our eyes from the wind, rain, and dust that we encounter on the road or trail.  If you are not wearing sunglasses or even clear lenses when it is cloudy, I would strongly suggest that you do! I have, on more than one occasion, taken a bug to the face descending at over 50 mph only to have it smack my sunglasses, therefore preventing disaster. As an eye doctor I have had to remove small pebbles, insect parts and have treated people for corneal abrasions (tree branches to the eye) because of similar episodes when people weren’t wearing proper eyewear.  And let me tell you, the eye is highly innervated with nerves, so anytime something gets in there it is painful – don’t let that happen to you…wear your glasses!  Some suggestions for eye wear would be photochromic or “transition” lenses that change depending on the light levels.  They have lenses that go from clear to a grey for people riding at dusk/dawn/wooded areas.  They also have lenses that start at a light grey and go to a dark grey as the sun becomes more radiant.  Popular sunglass companies for triathletes are Tifosi, Oakley, POC and Bolle.  Fortunately many sunglasses can now have prescriptions put into them, from single vision to bifocals (for those ages 40 plus that need to see both distance and your bike computer). For prescription I would recommend going to your local eye care provider where they can put your prescription lenses in the frame correctly.

Wear your sunglasses!

On another note, for those who are active, there is the option for contact lenses.  I am a huge believer in contact lenses when used appropriately. Contact lenses give you freedom and an extra field of view compared to glasses.  But…I still recommend wearing sunglasses when biking and running (to protect the eyes).  Contact lenses are a medical device so they need to be fit by a proper professional and not over worn.  With over-wear you will predispose yourself to eye infections which can be potentially blinding.  Most contact lenses these days do a great job with oxygen transmissibility (the ability of the contact lens to allow oxygen to get to the front part of your eye), which can help reduce the risk of infection compared to contacts of years past.  Most contacts are either a 1- day, 2 week or one month lens. There are contact lenses for people with near-sightedness, far-sightedness and astigmatism, but have even developed them for those who need bifocals.  I am a huge advocate of 1 day contact lenses (wear them one day then throw them out) – I wear them myself. Not only are they convenient – you don’t have to clean them – but most importantly, they are the healthiest option.  One day lenses are great for part-time wearers, allergy suffers and swimmers. I would not recommend swimming in contact lenses in general, but if you are going to, you might as well use the best option with one day lenses.  I especially point out swimmers because people who swim with contacts, whether in pools or open water, are predisposed to an infection from an Acanthamoeba. This infection is a very painful and vision threatening one. So in general, don’t swim in contacts, but if you do, only wear one day contacts and throw them out after use.

You then ask, “if I can’t swim in my contacts what can I do?”  There are companies that actually make prescription swimming goggles. The goggles work well and you can see with your prescription in them – now maybe you won’t run into the pool wall!

TYR Tracer Corrective Optical Goggle

Best of luck this season and if you have any questions contact your local eye care provider!

Five Time and Money-Saving Tips for the Vegan Endurance Athlete

By
February 9, 2015 on 11:11 pm | In Life at TriSports.com, Nutrition Tips, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by Team TriSports athlete Liz Miller. Many athletes are choosing to try training on a vegetarian, or even vegan, diet. Can it work for you? Learn some tips that can help make the transition a little easier. Check out Liz’s blog or follow her on Twitter – FeWmnLiz (can you tell she’s a geologist?).

Have you ever wondered about following a vegan diet but didn’t think you could do it while still maintaining a heavy workout load for your next half or full Ironman? I have been following a vegan diet for the past year and recently switched to mostly gluten-free, as well. I am a huge animal lover and advocate, but my decision to go vegan was based mostly on the desire to find the best possible diet for my body when it comes to maintaining a healthy weight and fast race times. The vegan lifestyle isn’t appropriate or feasible for everyone, but it can be a new and exciting way of eating. If you’re curious about trying it, here are a few simple time and money-saving tips for following a gluten-free and vegan lifestyle without breaking the bank or taking time away from training.

1. Find and join a local CSA (Community Supported Agriculture)

A CSA not only supports local farmers, it also reduces the time spent at the grocery store picking out all those fruits and vegetables each week. By joining a CSA, you’ll get a wide variety of fresh, local, in-season fruits and veggies that can make cooking fun and exciting. I had never even heard of kohlrabi until we got it in our CSA box one week! Whether your local CSA has a weekly pickup or a home delivery service, it easily saves 20 minutes or more at the grocery store and it can add fun and new foods to your weekly diet routine.

For more information, or to find a CSA near you, check out the Local Harvest website

Polenta crust pizza with pesto, caramelized onions, purple potatoes, and cashew ricotta. Basil for the pesto and purple potatoes from our local CSA!

2. When you’re making dinner on Sundays, make up a 2 or 3 cup batch of brown rice for the week

Because brown rice takes so long to cook, it’s a pain to cook it during the week when you get home at 8:00 PM and you’re starving and need food on the table FAST. A large batch of rice will easily keep in the refrigerator all week and can be used in a large variety of meals: veggie stir-fry, curry sidekick, black bean and rice burritos, tempeh and rice loaf. On nights when I am really pressed for time, I crisp up a few spoonfuls of rice in a nonstick pan, add some frozen peas and spinach, top with a few frozen wontons, and dinner is served!

3. Make friends with your Crock Pot

Crock pots aren’t just for cooking chewy chunks of meat! Some nights, I get home late and just want to eat and go to bed, not spend 45 minutes making dinner. Soups, stews, and curries all make great crock pot meals that are ready when you walk in the door.

4. Have a few quick meals in your arsenal that will make cooking dinner faster

Some of my favorite quick and easy meals are veggie burgers with baked French fries; brown rice pasta tossed with veggies, olive oil, lemon juice, and red pepper flakes; and a stir-fry made with rice, veggies, pineapple, cashews, and tofu. Having precooked rice and frozen veggies on hand at all times means that you have a quick, healthy, go-to meal filled with carbs and protein that can be on the table in 30 minutes or less.

5. Buy a 1 or 1.5 quart crock pot for cooking large batches of beans

Beans are a great source of fiber and protein with a wide variety of uses – hummus, salad toppers, and bean burritos, just to name a few options. Buying beans in bulk is significantly cheaper than buying canned beans, and a small crock pot will let you cook a batch of beans for the whole week. Mix up the beans each week for some variety!

Make friends with your crock pot

The vegan and gluten-free lifestyle isn’t for everyone, but with very little extra time and effort, it can be easy, quick, and maybe even a little cheaper than your current diet!

How Old Am I?

By
February 3, 2015 on 12:01 pm | In Community, Random Musings, Sponsorship | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion Karin Bivens. She got a late start in triathlon, but she’s tearing it up! Join her as she breaks down the confusing age group assignments in various sports. You may just end up more confused! Check out Karin’s blog and follow her on Twitter – @konakarin.

This past year was an “age-up” year for me! I was so excited and looking forward to being the youngest in the new age group which, in my case, is F70-74.  For all of the sanctioned triathlons and duathlons, I would race in my new age group since they have you race whatever age you will be as of December 31st of the current year.

In addition to my multisport events, I signed up for a number of running races, cycling races and swim competitions.  In the running races, however, they have you run the age you are on race day, so in all the running races for which I had registered that occurred prior to my birthday, I raced in the F65-69 age group.  Of course, it was very frustrating to know how much higher I would have placed in the next age group (although occasionally there was an exception where there was some “ringer” in the next age group), but running races do not use the age-up rule.

All smiles, even though she has no clue how old she is!

Like triathlons and duathlons, in official cycling races, you supposedly race your age as of December 31st, as well, unless you race in a “Cat” ranking; however, in a Time Trial which I did in February, results show me in the F65-69 age group even though my US Cycling license has me as F70-74, a mistake perhaps, but it didn’t matter this time as I would have won in either age group.

Swim competitions get complicated.  I did swim a USMS meet last January and asked the official which age group I would be racing under. I was told for that particular event, I raced my age on race day since the event was in yards! If the event had been in meters (International), though, then I would race in the new age group.  In checking out swim competitions online, I found that even this varies as some meets (even those in meters) still had you race your age on race day. Another interesting aspect was that if the swim meet covered more than one day, some races had you race all the days at your age the first day of the meet, while other had you race all the days at your age the LAST day of the meet.  Are you confused?  I sure am!

In the Senior Games and Senior Olympics that I found, they tend to have you race your age as of December 31st no matter what sport you compete in.

It does make it easier to race at the same age for the whole year, especially when it comes to annual rankings.  Plus it is a lot less confusing for races you do before your birthday in a year in which you move into a new age group. Moral of the story? Check closely to be sure that you are correctly registered for the appropriate age group when racing and realize that not all competitions have the same age rules.

Winner, winner!

Powered by WordPress. Based on Pool theme design by Borja Fernandez.
Entries and comments feeds. Valid XHTML and CSS. ^Top^