“Go-To” Trainer Workouts

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January 20, 2015 on 1:50 pm | In From the shop, Product Information, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Team Athlete Mark Tripp. Embarking on his first year as a Pro, he’s one to watch. Check out Mark’s blog and follow him on Twitter – @trippmj.

For most people, including me, riding outdoors is a lot more appealing than staring at a wall while riding your bike on a stationary trainer. But there are still those occasional cold and rainy days that end up interfering with planned bike workouts.  For these types of days, I am sharing two of my “go-to” trainer workouts. I ride these two workouts regularly and for different purposes.  One is intended to be an endurance workout for strength building and the other is more of an interval speed workout.

I should point out that these workouts are geared towards training for the Olympic distance triathlon, which consists of a 40 kilometer distance bike leg.  For my trainer setup I use a compact crank and my rear cassette has the following gearing: 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25.  For both workouts I also try to maintain a 90-95 RPM cadence throughout the entire workout.

Trainer sessions can be efficient and valuable additions to your triathlon training.  I understand that they can sometimes be boring, so to fight the boredom, I recommend incorporating some entertainment that helps the time pass by but does not distract you from your workout goals.  I typically listen to up-tempo music or if the timing is right, watch a football or basketball game on television.  If that doesn’t work, maybe try closing your eyes and pretend you are riding through the Swiss Alps.  Whatever you do, try to choose something that helps pass the time but doesn’t distract you from your trainer session goals. Happy trainering!!

Trainer set-up

Power Workout

I like this workout for early season training when I am trying to simply build strength and endurance.  It is perfect for the spring months when the days are still short.  If I am feeling frisky, I insert another half hour after the first 5 minute recovery that consists of 20 min (L-17), 3 min (L-16), 2 min (L-15), and 5 min (S-17).  If I am feeling less than frisky, I insert a 5 min cool down at 40 minutes and stop.  Note that the gearing descriptions describe the gearing in the form of “crank-rear”.  As an example, “S-17” means small chainring on the crank and 17 tooth chainring on the rear cassette, “L-16” would be large chainring and 16-tooth on the rear.

Time                        Gearing          Description

5 min                        S-17                Warm-up

30 min                      L-17                Cruise

3 min                        L-16                Hard

2 min                        L-15                Harder

5 min                        S-17                Recover

12 min                      L-17                Cruise

2 min                        L-16                Hard

1 min                        L-15                Harder

5 min                        S-17                Cool-down

Total: 1 hr 5 min

Strava data

Interval Workout

I like this workout for mid-season when I already built a base.  If I am feeling frisky, I’ll drop a gear on my rear cassette for parts 2 and 3 except for the recovery portions.  If I am feeling less than frisky, I’ll only repeat the first two parts twice each.

Time                               Gearing          Description

5 min                               S-17                Warm-up

Part 1 (repeat 3x)

1 min                               L-18                Moderate

3 min                               L-17                Cruise

1 min                               L-16                Hard

2 min                               S-17                Recovery

Part 2 (repeat 3x)

2 min                               L-18                Moderate

5 min                               L-17                Cruise

1 min                               L-16                Hard

2 min                               S-17                Recovery

Part 3 (repeat 2x)

1 min                               L-16                Hard

1 min                               L-15                Very Hard

1 min                               S-17                Recovery

Part 4

4 min                               S-17                Cool-down

Total: 1 hr 6 min

No More Belly-aching!

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January 12, 2015 on 12:00 pm | In Community, Nutrition Tips, Random Musings, Sponsorship, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion Monica Pagels. Unexplained tummy aches? Wondering if you can go gluten-free as a triathlete? Tune in and hear what Monica has to say!

Ever feel like your body just won’t cooperate during a workout? Maybe you just feel sluggish, or maybe feel muscle pain or fatigue, or maybe you’ve had that all too embarrassing intestinal discomfort while out on the run. If you’ve been a runner as long as I have (30 years and counting), you have experienced it all!  But what if it didn’t have to be that way? What if our runs could all be just as good as that one magical Fall long run in the woods when everything felt perfect and easy, and you remembered why you loved to run?!

Magical fall runs

Recently, my running, and fitness in general, went from bad to worse. In June, I was at the top of my game, having just completed my first Ironman in Coeur D’Alene, and by August I was suffering from extreme fatigue and muscle pain during my runs. Many said it was a delayed reaction to the IM, and to just ride/run through it. By October, my running was suffering even more, I was falling asleep during the day, my belly ached, and I suffered extreme headaches. Never before had I felt this bad for this many workouts in a row! Something had to change! By January, I was diagnosed with Celiac disease, which is an auto-immune disorder where your body attacks itself upon ingesting the protein gluten (wheat).  The cure, go figure, is to eliminate gluten from your diet… easier said than done, coming from the pasta-loving queen and post-race pizza crave!  We have all done crazier things, I thought, to improve our performance, so why not give it a try. Within 4 weeks, my everyday symptoms of fatigue, stomachaches, and headaches had all but disappeared, I had lost almost 10 pounds, and imagine my delight – I could finally run under 8 minute-mile pace again! Now, almost a year later, I continue to see improvements in the way I feel and how my body performs during workouts and races…and recovery!

What?! No more of this??

Could your workouts use some improvements? Are you darting off into the woods for those emergency bathroom stops? Giving up gluten may be worth a try! You do not have to be diagnosed with Celiac disease to have an intolerance to gluten. Admit it, we, as triathletes, love our pasta, breads and pizza! Could we have consumed it in such excess that our bodies now punish us? When I first gave up gluten, I thought it would be challenging to stick to the diet. I quickly realized that it is not what you are giving up, but what you are gaining instead!  I turned to much more whole and natural foods such as fruits, vegetables and long grain rice. I also love chicken, and have even come up with my own black bean burger recipe! Yes, I have become quite the pro in the kitchen, from peanut butter balls with chia seeds and red maca powder, to quinoa and apple energy bars, to beet and zucchini muffins! The benefits far outweigh the challenge of foregoing that fine micro-brew I used to cherish after a marathon (gluten-free beer is pretty decent, by the way)!

Gluten-free CAN be tasty!

Give the gluten-free life a try and see how it improves your performance, as well as your overall health. You will be amazed at the results, and your body will thank you by completing runs bathroom-stop free and begging for more miles!!

For terrific gluten free recipes or a list of gluten free foods, try the following websites:

Or, to hear more of my gluten-free journey and how it may help you, feel free to message me on Facebook!

The Best Thing about Triathlon

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January 5, 2015 on 12:00 pm | In Community, Random Musings, Training | No Comments

This blog brought to you by TriSports Champion George Cespedes. What is the best thing about triathlon? The fitness? Being able to eat whatever you want? The competition? Read on to learn what George thinks, and I think he’s onto something! Follow George on twitter – @georgecespedes.

We humans like to be part of a tribe. We have evolved to ascend to the top of the food chain, so to speak, by banding together in tribes, and through cooperation and shared experiences, built great civilizations and exist as part of many communities.

Triathlon is one such community that I love being a part of. Triathletes are awesome people. While we often find ourselves solo on long training rides or runs, or swimming endless laps in the pool with only the sound of our own labored breath in our ears, we do this to be a part of special niche in society. We share a love of testing our physical and mental boundaries, of following a training plan and the satisfaction of finishing a race.

As competitive as triathletes can be in training, racing and even life, they are also each others’ greatest cheerleaders, supporters and partners in pain.  We all know what it takes to get from the swim start to the finish chute and we love to celebrate the accomplishments of others.

Celebrating the finish - together

There is no bigger crowd gathered than around midnight of that epic race…you know the one I mean. Watching the last finishers stagger under the giant finish line clock to hear, “you are an Ironman,” somehow invigorates us all.  We race to be fit, to beat our previous finish time, to test ourselves, but we celebrate our fellow triathlete competitors’ accomplishments as happily as our own.

Crowds at midnight

Through my years as a triathlete, I have had enjoyed seeing the race kits from many different organizations and wondered what drives them to raise money for this cause or that person. I have raced for the Melanoma Research Foundation for the past two years and have just joined team Blazeman to race for ALS. I know, personally, that it gives meaning to the training time spent away from my family, the aches and pains that follow, and the tough miles out on the course. I am not just doing it for myself, for bragging rights, but to make a small difference in the world and give back to society in a meaningful and mutually beneficial way.

Another big reason I love being part of the triathlon community is because of how diverse it is. People from all walks of life, ages, and abilities make up the sport and triathlon community. I love meeting triathletes at different events across the country. Being a member of the TriSports Champions team has given me the opportunity to meet so many of these unique and wonderful people. We are all out there racing for our own reasons, but we share a lot of the same experiences and goals.  I follow my teammates and friends to see how they are doing and I know they are doing the same for me. We want everyone to have a good race, to have a PR, to finish, because beyond our competitive fire is a shared passion for the sport and we know what it takes to finish, even if you are the last finisher.

Diversity is the name of the game

Being part of the triathlon community has enriched my life in so many ways.  It’s about so much more than being really fit, new PRs, finisher’s medals and swag bags, though. The best thing about triathlon is the triathletes!

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